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Archives for October 2014

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Ebola – two things I know to be true: from Dr. Steven Mulder

mulderEbola – two things I know to be true:

  1. It’s real and it’s very dangerous.
  2. It’s difficult to separate reality from fantasy amid all the media hype.

The risk of encountering an Ebola patient at Hutchinson Health is low, but it is not zero; we must be prepared. We are taking the following steps:

  • Infection Prevention and Safety staff along with senior leadership are monitoring updates from the Minnesota Department of Health and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention on a daily basis. Recommendations are evolving as new information becomes available.
  • Registration is asking screening questions of all patients presenting to Hutchinson Health at any location. They will ask about travel to high risk areas, exposure to Ebola patients, and typical symptoms.
  • ER staff will be notified of any patients with positive answers to the screening questions. They will immediately initiate isolation precautions and the patient will be escorted to a special isolation room where they will be evaluated. Patients with a highly suspicious history and active symptoms will be transferred to an appropriately equipped facility.

Even if we never see an Ebola patient, we must be prepared; the preparation in and of itself is a useful exercise.

The dedication of health care workers here in Hutchinson and around the world is inspiring; we are truly grateful to them.

Steve

Steven Mulder, MD
President and CEO
Hutchinson Health

 

Hutchinson Health Birthcare Video

Pregnant? Thinking about pregnancy?

Watch our BirthCare video and check out  our physicians that offer pregnancy and delivery, as well as our highly trained staff and facility.  Delivering the best in care!

Dr. Remucal Celebrating 40 Years

We are celebrating H. Cris Remucal’s 40 years of service with Hutchinson Health (1973 – 2013).

Please join us for an appreciation gathering:

Tuesday, November 18, 2014
5:00 – 6:00 p.m.
Hutchinson Health Hospital Foyer

Myths and Facts about the Flu Vaccine #6

Dr. Leah Schrupp, Family Medicine Physician at Hutchinson Health, has some information about flu vaccines.

Myth #6:

It’s better to wait until flu cases start showing up to get vaccinated

Fact #6:

It’s best to get vaccinated before the flu starts to spread in your community. It is not possible to know exactly when the flu season will start each year. While seasonal influenza outbreaks can happen as early as October, most of the time influenza activity peaks in January or later. Since it takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body that protect against influenza virus infection, it is best that people get vaccinated earlier rather than later, so they are protected before influenza begins spreading in their community.

Myths and Facts about the Flu Vaccine #5

Dr. Leah Schrupp, Family Medicine Physician at Hutchinson Health, has some information about flu vaccines.

Myth #5:

There’s no reason to get a flu shot every year

Fact #5:

Flu viruses are constantly changing. Flu vaccines may be updated from one season to the next to protect against the viruses that research indicates will be most common during the upcoming flu season. Annual vaccination is also recommended as a person’s immune protection from the vaccine declines over time, so to maintain optimal immunity, yearly vaccines are recommended.

Myths and Facts about the Flu Vaccine #4

Dr. Leah Schrupp, Family Medicine Physician at Hutchinson Health, has some information about flu vaccines.

Myth #4:

If I’m young and healthy, I don’t need to worry about a flu vaccine.

Fact #4:

While it is true that a young, healthy person will likely recover from influenza ok, annual vaccination is still important. While they themselves might be at low risk for getting serious flu complications, other people in their family might not. If you have a small child at home, or an older parent, your failure to get yourself vaccinated could endanger them. And that’s true on a larger, societal level. People with the weakest defenses, like children under 6 months, can’t get the flu vaccine. Their safety depends on the rest of us getting immunized.flubaby

Myths and Facts about the Flu Vaccine #3

Dr. Leah Schrupp, Family Medicine Physician at Hutchinson Health, has some information about flu vaccines.

Myth #3:

The flu shot can give you the flu

Fact #3:

Injected flu vaccines only contain dead virus, and a dead virus can’t infect you. There is one type of live virus flu vaccine, the nasal vaccine, FluMist. But in this case, the virus is specially engineered to remove the parts of the virus that make people sick. Because the flu vaccine is given during cold season, many people coincidentally obtain a cold around the time they get the vaccine, making it seem like the vaccine made them sick.

Myths and Facts about the Flu Vaccine #2

Dr. Leah Schrupp, Family Medicine Physician at Hutchinson Health, has some information about flu vaccines.

Myth #2:

Influenza is “just a bad cold.”

Fact #2:

Sure, most people who get the seasonal flu recover just fine. But the seasonal flu also hospitalizes about 200,000 people in the U.S. each year. It kills between 3,000 and 49,000 people. That means that in a good year, influenza kills roughly the same number of people killed thus far in the current Ebola outbreak, and in a bad year, 10 times that many.