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Archives for September 2016

September is National Sepsis Awareness Month

September is National Sepsis Awareness Month
How can you prevent sepsis?
1 Get vaccinated
2 Prevent infections that can lead to sepsis by:
•• Cleaning scrapes and wound
•• Practicing good hygiene (e.g., hand washing,
bathing regularly)
3 If you have an infection, look for signs like:
fever, chills, rapid breathing and heart rate,
rash, confusion, and disorientation.

Did you know that Muhammad Ali and Patty Duke died from Sepsis?
Who is at a greater risk of getting sepsis?
Anyone can get sepsis from an infection, but the risk is higher in:
•• people with weakened immune systems
•• babies and very young children
•• elderly people
•• people with chronic illnesses, such as diabetes, AIDS, cancer, and kidney or liver disease
•• people suffering from a severe burn or wound
Ask your doctor about your risk for getting sepsis.

Walk & Bike to School Day

Walking School BusWalk & Bike to School Day is Wednesday, October 5th.

Park Elementary will host Mayor Gary Forcier, Fire Chief Mike Schumann and Police Chief Dan Hatten and other Heart of Hutch volunteers leading groups of kids along identified walking routes for the 5th year!   Snack station will be available to walkers, bikers and volunteers in the am.

Check out the Walking School Bus Routes and join us on our way to Park Elementary!

In light of concerns that parents have been voicing, Police Chief Hatten has provided this statement –

“The Annual Walk to School Day is an opportunity for us as a community to encourage our children to begin healthy life style habits by walking to school. It is also an opportunity to renew or begin family safety plans to prevent abductions. This event affirms the message that our community is safe and we as a community will not be limited by criminal behavior in our society.”

Family Safety Planning tips from Chief Hatten.

Walking Safety information and tips

Bike and Pedestrian Videos from the Bicycle Alliance of MN.

 

Family Safety Planning Tips

A message from Hutchinson Police Chief, Dan Hatten

I believe it is important to teach children how to avoid being seized, how to resist a potential captor and how to escape. Kids are vulnerable and trusting, and it is our job as parents to remind them of basic safety rules, including:

1.Don’t walk away with anyone other than a parent, or the person who was already arranged to take care of you that day. 2. Remember, an adult does not need help from a child — not to find a puppy, not for anything. If an adult is asking you for help, that’s a warning sign. 3. Avoid getting into a car with a stranger at all costs. 4. Know the rules: what is OK and what is not OK, and have confidence to take action if you feel someone is trying to take advantage of you.

The most important thing parents can do is to communicate openly with their children at home. Have a home atmosphere in which kids can let you know what is going on in their life. A very important point is to re-learn old concepts of adult/children interaction. Teach your child his rights. He has the right to say “no.” Children should know there are different rules for different situations; they don’t have to always be polite. Politeness can translate into doing what the potential abductor says.

Teach Your Child Techniques to Avoid Being Taken In any potential abduction situation, there are windows of opportunity for the child to make choices that could save his or her life. Abductors win through intimidation, so it is very important to give your child good self-esteem and the confidence to carry through these possibly life-saving techniques. Consider practicing these techniques at home or school, with other parents and kids. The more kids practice, the more they will remember these techniques, and the more secure and confident they will feel in following through if they ever have to.

  1. The Velcro technique — Make like Velcro: Grab and hold onto something and do not let go. Grab a tree, grab a bike, grab a stop sign post, or even grab a different adult, because another adult is not usually involved in an abduction. This makes it harder to disengage a child in an attempted abduction. 2. Yell as loud as you can “Stop, Stranger!” — Teach your child that anyone that is not a mother or father is in the new definition of a stranger if they are trying to take you away. 3. Windmill technique or swimming technique — Rotate arms in a big circle, preventing attacker from getting a good grip. This can turn attackers arms inside out — which is a weaker position from which he could grab hold of the child. 4. Make a lot of noise — Give a child a whistle on a necklace and teach them to blow on that whistle when they might be in danger. Bang on something, scream, be loud to call attention from others who might be able to help. A good commotion can frighten an abductor and by shifting the balance of power, turn the tables on them.

How to escape from a car If a child is somehow placed into a car by an abductor, there is usually a three-hour window of opportunity. The abductor doesn’t usually hurt the child immediately — there is time to escape if the child-learned-behavior allows the child not to panic and be reactive. Therefore, it is helpful for children to know methods of escaping, such as the following:

  1. Reach for the door and try to get out immediately. 2. Do not be passive. In a four-door car, the child can jump in the backseat and try the door quickly. 3. If the child is placed in a trunk, don’t panic: Look for a panel in the trunk that comes right out when you pull on it. Tear the wires to the tail-lights and brakes. Police might then pull the abductor over.

Abductors are often someone whom the child knows Abductors don’t usually fit the stereotypical profile of a scary, creepy stranger or dirty old man. Motives are often sexual and most are not true strangers. They target children and seek their confidence by developing a casual relationship with them. Family abductors make up the majority of kidnap offenders, as in a custody battle.

Final safety reminders for parents 1. Know where your children are, and know who they know. 2. Pay attention to changes in your child’s behavior. 3. Never leave your child alone in a public place, car, or stroller. 4. Never ask a stranger to hold your baby, even for an instant. 5. Don’t label their lunch boxes or clothing. 6. Don’t let children go out alone. Remember the buddy system in swimming. 7. Teach your child their telephone number, how to contact you and a close friend. 8. Pay attention to threats. 9. In custody battles, get social security, credit card numbers, and addresses. 10. Take a lot of photos of your child and keep them current. 11. Keep dental and medical records. 12. Have a neighborhood meeting so that children know safe houses in the neighborhood where they can run in the case of an emergency. 13. Never open the door without having a secret password between you and your child. 14. Older children should be encouraged to use their critical thinking and intuition, and to anticipate, for example, slow-driving cars in front of a neighborhood or playground.

Remember, above all else, safety first. Prevention is the key. Develop a family plan of action for emergency and crisis situation, and practice and rehearse them with your children through role modeling and role-playing. Teach your children the rules, and give them the confidence they need to be able to follow through on the escape techniques outlined above. Emphasize your child’s right of privacy and ownership, and that sexual advances from adults are against the law.

If they are involved and invested, children are more likely to remember and take action if someone tries to abduct them. We have to empower our kids to help keep them safe.

How to escape from a car If a child is somehow placed into a car by an abductor, there is usually a three-hour window of opportunity. The abductor doesn’t usually hurt the child immediately — there is time to escape if the child-learned-behavior allows the child not to panic and be reactive. Therefore, it is helpful for children to know methods of escaping, such as the following:

  1. Reach for the door and try to get out immediately. 2. Do not be passive. In a four-door car, the child can jump in the backseat and try the door quickly. 3. If the child is placed in a trunk, don’t panic: Look for a panel in the trunk that comes right out when you pull on it. Tear the wires to the tail-lights and brakes. Police might then pull the abductor over.

Abductors are often someone whom the child knows Abductors don’t usually fit the stereotypical profile of a scary, creepy stranger or dirty old man. Motives are often sexual and most are not true strangers. They target children and seek their confidence by developing a casual relationship with them. Family abductors make up the majority of kidnap offenders, as in a custody battle.

Final safety reminders for parents

  1. Know where your children are, and know who they know.
  2. Pay attention to changes in your child’s behavior.
  3. Never leave your child alone in a public place, car, or stroller.
  4. Never ask a stranger to hold your baby, even for an instant.
  5. Don’t label their lunch boxes or clothing.
  6. Don’t let children go out alone. Remember the buddy system in swimming.
  7. Teach your child their telephone number, how to contact you and a close friend.
  8. Pay attention to threats.
  9. In custody battles, get social security, credit card numbers, and addresses.
  10. Take a lot of photos of your child and keep them current.
  11. Keep dental and medical records.
  12. Have a neighborhood meeting so that children know safe houses in the neighborhood where they can run in the case of an emergency.
  13. Never open the door without having a secret password between you and your child.
  14. Older children should be encouraged to use their critical thinking and intuition, and to anticipate, for example, slow-driving cars in front of a neighborhood or playground.

Remember, above all else, safety first. Prevention is the key. Develop a family plan of action for emergency and crisis situation, and practice and rehearse them with your children through role modeling and role-playing. Teach your children the rules, and give them the confidence they need to be able to follow through on the escape techniques outlined above. Emphasize your child’s right of privacy and ownership, and that sexual advances from adults are against the law.

If they are involved and invested, children are more likely to remember and take action if someone tries to abduct them. We have to empower our kids to help keep them safe.

          Safety tips from Dr. Gail Gross

          Respectfully,

          Daniel T. Hatten

          Hutchinson Police Chief

Catch those Pesty Fruit Flies

Do you have those annoying small “fruit fly” bugs buzzing around your house? Dr. Tiffany Trenda, pediatrician at Hutchinson Health, has a great method to rid your home of the pesty bugs.
A large mouthed glass with apple cider vinegar, fill with some dish soap and add water to make suds. The bubbles catch the bugs and they drown. Dump and redo mixture when many are floating. This WORKS!

bugs

Homemade Cough Syrup by Dr. Leah Willson

Get ready for flu season….Dr. Leah Willson, Hutchinson Health pediatrician shares her homemade recipes for cough syrups, if you would like to make a version that is natural. Kids may even prefer the taste.
Effective Natural Homemade Cough Syrup Recipes for children 1 year and older. NOT intended for babies under 12 months of age.
#1
1 cup pineapple juice
1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
One level teaspoon ginger powder
Two tablespoons honey
Dash of salt (1/8 teaspoon or less)
Dash of cayenne pepper (1/8 teaspoon or less)
Blend in blender or food processor until smooth and no lumps of powder.
Store in refrigerator.
Can give 1 to 2 teaspoons up to every 2 hours as needed for cough.
NOT for children under 12 months of age.
#2

1/4 cup of pineapple juice and 1/4 cup of honey
OR
1/4 cup of lemon juice and 1/4 cup of honey
Blend well. Store in refrigerator.
Can be given as needed for cough
NOT for children under 12 months of age.

child-taking-cough-syrup

Flu Talk – Get the Facts from the CDC

Health Care Home Featured in Hutchinson Leader

Hutchinson Leader showcases Hutchinson Health’s new program Health Care Home.  This program helps patients with their care plan, insurance questions, and overall health plan.

http://www.crowrivermedia.com/hutchinsonleader/news/local/when-a-little-help-can-go-a-long-way/article_68d689bd-bb89-5262-a5da-1d1e0c8ea172.html

 

Meet Our New Providers: Dr. Stuckey & Dr. Avery

Dr. StuckeyDr. Mark Stuckey

Mark Stuckey, DO is Hutchinson Health’s new Family Medicine physician. He and his family moved to Hutchinson when he completed his residency. Dr. Stuckey specializes in family medicine, sports medicine, and general health care. He will be performing colonoscopy and endoscopic procedures.  Dr. Stuckey looks forward to practicing medicine in a variety of settings with colleagues who would push him to be his best.

HH_HomeFeatured_AveryDr. William Avery

William Avery, DO is Hutchinson Health’s new ENT physician. Dr. Avery specializes in conditions of ear, nose, and throat and will provide care in the areas of nasal and sinus disorders, ear infections, throat and voice conditions, hearing disorders, dizziness. The key to Dr. Avery’s philosophy of care is helping patients understand their options and choose the most appropriate one.

Both providers are now seeing patients. Call to make your appointment today.