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Archives for February 2017

March is Food Drive Month in McLeod County

full-color-logo-768x380Drop off your donations at the Hutchinson Health Clinic and Hospital. Hutchinson Health will match the weight in cash donation up to $500. Our goal is to try and reach 25% of our donation to be healthy food options. We aim to provide your neighbors with the healthiest food possible.


 

Here is an expanded list of healthy non-perishable foods you can donate.

Items

  • Canned fish, such as salmon, tuna and sardines
  • Canned meats, such as chicken and turkey
  • Whole grains, such as quinoa and spelt
  • Rice (brown, wild)
  • Steel-cut or rolled oats
  • Whole grain dry cereals with at least 5 grams fiber/serving
  • Whole grain pastas, such as whole wheat, brown rice flour or quinoa
  • Fruits in natural juice with no sugar added
  • Canned vegetables, low salt or no added salt
  • Canned fruit packed in water versus syrup
  • Canned or boxed low-sodium soups and stews
  • Dried or canned legumes, such as peas, lentils, peanuts and beans
  • Pureed foods, such as sweet potato, pumpkin and applesauce
  • Low-fat dry or shelf-stable milk
  • Nut butters, including peanut, almond, walnut
 

 

Healthy Eating Plate

We encourage you to give the best food possible, but also realize you have a budget. If you can afford to donate organic items, great. If not, that’s OK, too. Every donation makes a difference. What’s most important is that we all come together to help our neighbors.

Harvard_Plate_small

Spring Forward

We’re ready for Spring!  As the weather warms up, we’re ready to lace up and get outside.  Check out 2017’s list of activities and consider trying something new this year.  #MuchinHutch

 

6 small steps to improve your health in a big way

Author: Kay Johnson

You want to be healthier, right? But try as you might, it always seems like something’s standing in your way. Time and money are two of the largest obstacles, and you may think it’s impossible to improve your health without a significant time or financial investment.

The good news is, however, that’s not true. Even the smallest changes can have a big impact on your health, and you can start improving your wellness today with these six simple steps:

5 Winter Survival Tips for Beating Cabin Fever

Yes, it’s still winter.

Call it cabin fever, winter doldrums or winter blues, it is significantly different from the more serious seasonal affective disorder or SAD but still affects our emotional well-being. Dr. Mark Frye from the Mayo Clinic’s Psychology and Psychiatry Department reminds us that a healthy lifestyle strategy is especially helpful during these winter months. Here are a few simple steps from Frye that we can all do.

1. Get plenty of exercise. Depending on the weather, that may mean finding an indoor spot to walk such as the Hutch Mall or the Hutchinson Recreation Center gym. Check out the wealth of opportunities to exercise listed in the Leader’s Fitness Connection, too.

2. Get outside especially when sunny. Try out snowshoeing by renting a pair of snowshoes from Hutchinson Parks and Rec for $5 for a couple of hours. If it’s one of our colder days, that may mean just a quick walk around the block.

3. Take breaks during the day. Frye suggests looking for a spot near a window. Now might be the time for that quick walk outside.

4. Open window shades. OK, that seems really obvious as a way to fight cabin fever but it’s easy to overlook when you’re having a down day.

5. Keep social in Hutchinson. During any given week, there are a variety of activities to enjoy. Check out the calendars of events put out by the Hutchinson Area Chamber of Commerce and Tourism, the Hutchinson Leader, KDUZ Radio and HCVN television station. Call that friend or relative you’ve been meaning to connect with. They may be experiencing the blahs as well and you may be just the bright spot they needed in their day.

Contributed by Mary Henke, Connect Committee Volunteer

 

Relay For Life Bake Sale at Hutchinson Health

Valentine Sale Fundraiser
Tuesday, February 14th

7:30am until supplies last
Clinic Foyer

Carnations and Candy $2 Each

Hutchinson Health Relay for Life Team Fundraiser

Hutchinson Health is expanding Urgent Care, enhancing other service areas

This is a great article Hutchinson Leader wrote announcing Hutchinson Health’s plan for expanded and improved patient services. These projects align with our mission of “Advancing Health With Our Community”.

Check the Leader’s website for the full article.

When completed in winter 2018, the project will improve facilities — in some cases, double the space — for the hospital/clinic’s oncology, cardiac rehab, pediatric rehab and Urgent Care services.

Hutchinson Health’s managers said they have discussed the changes for a long time. But it was Mother Nature — in the form of last summer’s heavy rains causing serious water drainage issues and heavy damage to the hospital’s lower level — that accelerated their plans.

Since July, pediatric rehab services have operated out of the hospital’s outpatient mental health location across the street from the hospital in the Plaza 15 shopping center. The space formerly housing pediatric services has stood empty until drainage issues can be worked out.

“We realized we had a fairly serious construction project facing us to address these issues,” said Jim Lyons, Hutchinson Health’s chief of clinic operations.

Perhaps the most noticeable improvement will be the expansion of Urgent Care. Starting in late April, Urgent Care will expand its hours to 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., 365 days of the year. The service is currently open Monday through Friday, and Saturday mornings, and closed on Sundays and holidays.

Urgent Care, now operating inside Hutchinson Health’s clinic, will eventually move into its own quarters between the clinic and emergency room on the east end of the hospital campus.

That will force two popular amenities to close. The hospital auxiliary’s coffee shop will close Oct. 1. Family Rexall Drug’s pharmacy will close at the end of May, according to owner Brad Lueneburg.

Hutchinson Health officials said they understand those changes might not be popular with some patients and visitors, but the remodeling plans — hinging on a “care that fits” strategy — left few choices.

“This is all driven around the patients,” Lyons said. “The building project is centered around how we serve the community and improve patient experiences.”

Urgent Care’s expansion will make it easier for patients who now must choose where to go in urgent medical situations. President and CEO Dr. Steve Mulder said those patients now visit the hospital’s emergency room or travel to another community where Urgent Care services are open on weekends and holidays.

“We think the seven-day-a-week Urgent Care is going to have a major impact for the community,” Mulder said. “… It will bridge the gap between the clinic, where people go for their physician care, and the emergency room, where they go for their emergency care.”

Mulder said a “scaled-down version” of the coffee shop might eventually return “at some point.” Hospital and clinic visitors can also use the hospital’s cafeteria.

Mulder and Lyons said plans for Urgent Care’s expansion, along with the closing of the coffee shop and pharmacy, were discussed in-depth with Hutchinson Health’s Patient Family Advisory Committee. The committee was formed eight months ago, with patients and their family members constituting a majority of the committee.

Lueneburg said he decided to close the pharmacy at the end of May because business normally slows down during the summer.

“I have mixed feelings about it,” he said. “It hate to be doing it. But having seven-day-a-week Urgent Care, in order to do it right, they need to have that space.”

Lueneburg said his customers can visit his downtown location at 237 Hassan St. S.E.

“Of course, we’ll move our staff there and try to make it as easy as possible for (customers),” he said. “And we have good parking (at that location).”

In addition to the larger space for Urgent Care, more space for oncology services is another major improvement.

“There will be double the space,” Mulder said. “It’s huge. It’s very exciting. The space will match the level of services (the Cancer Clinic staff) provides.”